Instant Pot Bone Broth [Recipe]

Instant Pot Bone Broth [Recipe] by Chartered Wellness

Bone broth is a staple in my house. I use it as a base for soups and stews, and to it replace water in pretty much any recipe I make (except for dessert, that would be extreme, even for me).

The health benefits are numerous - I actually wrote a whole post about it here - but as a quick summary, it’s excellent for healing the gut, joint health, contributing to healthy nails, hair, and skin, and supporting detoxification. In other words, it’s liquid gold.

You can buy it at the store, but it’s pretty expensive and making your own is surprisingly easy. This bone broth recipe is super quick to prep and then you just forget about it until it’s finished cooking.

You can make bone broth with many different types of bones. I’ve chosen chicken bones for this bone broth recipe because they’re easy to get and the broth is light and versatile enough to use in many ways.

How To Make Good Bone Broth

The most important thing when making bone broth is ensuring you get good-quality bones. Bones from pasture-raised animals who lived happy, healthy lives will be higher in nutrients and lower in potential toxins.

If you’re thinking that this sounds well and good, but you have no idea where you would actually find bones, don’t worry, I’ve got you covered. A few options:

  • At your local farmer’s market. Ask around at stalls that sell grass-fed/pasture-raised meats, many of them will sell bones.
  • From a local butcher.
  • Save the leftover bones when you roast a whole chicken.
  • Online. There are companies that will ship pasture-raised bones to you like Primal Pastures or Healthy Traditions. You can also do an online search for farms in your area that will deliver bones to you.

If you’re making chicken broth, it’s best to use a mixture of bones, including backs, necks, feet. This will make sure the broth is rich in healing nutrients like collagen, glucosamine, and hyaluronic acid.

The amount of bones you need per batch honestly depends on the size of your pot. Between 1-3 pounds is usually good, but again, feel free to fit as many bones in your pot as you can, and save the rest in the freezer for the next batch.

Another thing to note before diving into this bone broth recipe. The only things you really need for bone broth are bones and water. Everything else is just extra. I like to add herbs and vegetables for improved taste and added nutrients, but the recipe below is just a suggestion. Feel free to add whatever herbs and veggies you like. My only suggestion would be to avoid cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, kale, etc) because they get really stinky when you cook them for a long time.

Instant Pot Bone Broth [Recipe]

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This delicious chicken bone broth recipe includes instructions for the Instant Pot, slow cooker, and stove top.

Bone broth is a nutrient goldmine and helpful for improving gut health, skin health, nails and hair, as well as supporting joint health.

It can be used as a base for soups or stews, cooking liquid for rice or grains, or as a replacement for water in most recipes.

Note: If you are following a low FODMAP diet, feel free to omit the garlic and onion. You can replace with the green part of a leek.

Ingredients:

Chicken bones (including 2-3 feet if desired for extra gelatin)
2-3 stalks of celery
1 large carrot
1 onion
½ head garlic
½ bunch parsley
1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar (helps pull minerals from the bones)
2 tsp sea salt
Filtered water
Optional: 1 sheet kombu (a tasteless seaweed that adds extra nutrients + minerals to the broth)

[Note: I recommend using organic ingredients if possible, here’s why]

Instructions:

Instant Pot

Rinse and chop vegetables into large chunks. No need to peel.

Starting with the bones, add all ingredients to Instant Pot. Cover with filtered water, making sure not to fill above “MAX” line on the pot liner.

Close lid, turn valve to “Sealing”. Turn instant pot on and press the “Manual” button. Set timer for 90 minutes.

When the broth has finished cooking, turn the pot completely off. Let the broth cool for 15-20 minutes, before quick releasing. If you have time to wait for natural release, even better.

Use a pair of tongs to take out as many of the solid, big pieces as possible. Discard the vegetables and bones. Then strain the broth (I usually do it through a cheesecloth). Now’s a good time to taste the broth and add extra salt to your taste.

Pour into glass jars and store in the fridge for 5 days or the freezer for up to 6 months.

Slow Cooker

Rinse and chop vegetables into large chunks. No need to peel.

Starting with the bones, add all the ingredients to the crockpot. Add filtered water until everything is covered (if a few bones are poking out of the water, that’s fine).

Set the crockpot on low and cook for 24 hours. This timing doesn’t have to be exact, so feel free to cook for a little longer or a little less time.

Turn off the pot, then use tongs to take out the bones and large pieces of vegetables.

Strain the broth (I usually do it through a cheesecloth). Now’s a good time to taste the broth and add extra salt to your taste.

Pour into glass jars and store in the fridge for 5 days or the freezer for up to 6 months

Stove Top

Rinse and chop vegetables into large chunks. No need to peel.

Starting with the bones, add all the ingredients to a large pot.

Add filtered water until the bones are completely covered (it’s ok if a few are poking out of the water).

Turn burner on high to bring the pot to a boil. Once the pot is boiling, reduce to a simmer. Cover and cook at a low simmer for around 24 hours. This timing is approximate so feel free to go for a little longer or a little less time.

Once the stove is turned off and the pot is cool enough to touch, strain the broth (I usually pour it through a cheesecloth). Now is a good time to taste it and add more salt to taste.

Pour into glass jars and store in the fridge for 5 days or the freezer for up to 6 months.

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Instant Pot Bone Broth | Chartered Wellness

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